Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow examines what might happen to the world when old myths are coupled with new godlike technologies, such as artificial intelligence and genetic engineering.
Humans conquered the world thanks to their unique ability to believe in collective myths about gods, money, equality and freedom – as described in Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. In Homo Deus, Prof. Harari looks to the future and explores how global power might shift, as the principal force of evolution – natural selection – is replaced by intelligent design.
What will happen to democracy when Google and Facebook come to know our likes and our political preferences better than we know them ourselves? What will happen to the welfare state when computers push humans out of the job market and create a massive new “useless class”? How might Islam handle genetic engineering? Will Silicon Valley end up producing new religions, rather than just novel gadgets?
As Homo sapiens becomes Homo deus, what new destinies will we set for ourselves? As the self-made gods of planet earth, which projects should we undertake, and how will we protect this fragile planet and humankind itself from our own destructive powers? The book Homo Deus gives us a glimpse of the dreams and nightmares that will shape the 21st century.
Running Time: 10 hrs and 43 mins
Started Listening: October 14, 2019
Finished Listening: October 30, 2019
This version of The Innocent Ones features a soundtrack that includes music and sound effects designed to enhance the listening experience.
I got this book for free as part of an Audible promotion.
This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas published between 1929 and 1964, containing 11 great classics. No anthology better captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had appeared before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction and was a favorite of libraries across the country.
This volume contains the following:

  • Introduction by Ben Bova
  • Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
  • Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell Jr. (as Don A. Stuart)
  • Nerves by Lester del Rey
  • Universe by Robert A. Heinlein
  • The Marching Morons by C. M. Kornbluth
  • Vintage Season by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore (as Lawrence O’Donnell)
  • And Then There Were None by Eric Frank Russell
  • The Ballad of Lost C’Mell by Cordwainer Smith
  • Baby Is Three by Theodore Sturgeon
  • The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  • With Folded Hands by Jack Williamson

February 25, 2019 – Started Reading
June 25, 2019 – Finished Reading

Rating : 👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾
Read/listened to during my commute.
We are not born knowing what to eat; as omnivores it is something we each have to figure out for ourselves. From childhood onward, we learn how big a “portion” is and how sweet is too sweet. We learn to enjoy green vegetables—or not. But how does this education happen? What are the origins of taste?

Eating well is a skill. We learn it. Or not. It’s something we can work on at any age.

In First Bite, award-winning food writer Bee Wilson draws on the latest research from food psychologists, neuroscientists, and nutritionists to reveal that our food habits are shaped by a whole host of factors: family and culture, memory and gender, hunger and love.

We worry about the next five minutes when we should be thinking about the next five years.

The way we learn to eat holds the key to why food has gone so disastrously wrong for so many people. But Wilson also shows that both adults and children have immense potential for learning new, healthy eating habits. An exploration of the extraordinary and surprising origins of our tastes and eating habits, First Bite also shows us how we can change our palates to lead healthier, happier lives.